Read Maailmanhistorian suurimmat huijaukset ja ihmiset niiden takana by Eric Chaline Leena Nilsson Online

maailmanhistorian-suurimmat-huijaukset-ja-ihmiset-niiden-takana

Toisinaan rehellisyys perii maan. Toisinaan todellakaan ei. Ihmiskunnan historia on täynnä petoksia ja toinen toistaan uskomattomampia huijauksia. Jopa Raamattu aloittaa kertomuksen ihmiskunnasta käärmeen valheella Eevalle, ja esimerkiksi antiikin jumalat olivat erityisen kieroa sakkia. Suurimmista petoksista vastaavat kuitenkin ihmiset ihan itse. He ovat kautta aikojen pyToisinaan rehellisyys perii maan. Toisinaan todellakaan ei. Ihmiskunnan historia on täynnä petoksia ja toinen toistaan uskomattomampia huijauksia. Jopa Raamattu aloittaa kertomuksen ihmiskunnasta käärmeen valheella Eevalle, ja esimerkiksi antiikin jumalat olivat erityisen kieroa sakkia. Suurimmista petoksista vastaavat kuitenkin ihmiset ihan itse. He ovat kautta aikojen pyrkineet saavuttamaan valtaa ja rikkauksia huijaamalla. Muiden ihmisten hyväuskoisuus on yleensä ollut vain avuksi.Maailmanhistorian suurimmat petokset jatkaa lukijoiden suosimaa sarjaa, jossa on aiemmin kerrottu huonoista päätöksistä ja keksinnöistä. Kirja tarjoaa uskomattoman laajan ja kekseliään katsauksen antiikista nykyaikaan. Moni saattaa muistaa kuuluisan filmin lumimiehestä. Tai naisen, joka väitti olevansa Venäjän viimeisen keisarin Nikolai II:n tytär Anastasia. Sen sijaan useimmilta on voinut jäädä huomaamatta, että Kiinassa eli 1800-luvulla mies, joka väitti olevansa Jeesuksen pikkuveli. Nämä ja monet muut mielikuvitukselliset metkut löytyvät tämän kirjan sivuilta!...

Title : Maailmanhistorian suurimmat huijaukset ja ihmiset niiden takana
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9789515021229
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 256 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Maailmanhistorian suurimmat huijaukset ja ihmiset niiden takana Reviews

  • Jenna Leigh
    2019-05-06 13:49

    I enjoyed reading this book quite a bit, but there are some weird things about it. It was a good starting place to learn about some of the curiouser points in history, and it gave me subjects to do some deeper research on.I'm not going to hide this review, but there are spoilers in it, so be forewarned!The problem is that the author seems to have injected his own personal opinion into the reporting of the stories, rather than just the facts at certain points throughout the book. For example, some of the chapters, in my opinion, should not have been included, because they have not conclusively been proven to be hoaxes/deceptions beyond a shadow of a doubt. There is a whole chapter on the legendary heroine Hua Mulan and how she dressed deceptively as a man, while there has not been conclusive evidence to prove that she actually existed, a fact that is only casually mentioned at the end of the chapter. There is also one on Pope Joan, another person who is not yet proven to have existed. There is a chapter on the Patterson-Gimlin Bigfoot film, where the author states at the beginning that "the inclusion of the Patterson-Gimlin film in these pages will please some and annoy others, because there is as yet no incontrovertible proof that the film is a hoax." He also states later in the chapter that "In many cases of Bigfoot sightings, a misidentified bear is probably the most likely explanation." He's right, I am annoyed, mostly because both of these statements just prove to me that he was relying on his own opinion and trying to fill space in the book. At one point he makes a statement about Edward Plantagenet, 17th Earl of Warwick having been "thought to have suffered from what we would call 'serious learning disabilities'". That Edward was possibly mentally challenged is controversial, and is based on one line the chronicler Edward Hall wrote, where it says that he was imprisoned so long that "he could not discern a Goose from a Capon." These are just some examples of places where he would state things as being a fact when they have not been entirely proven, or examples of what seemed to be amateur research, where a quick Google search would have uncovered the same information.My final word is that the book definitely had good points, and that it is a great starting place, but you're going to want to research further if you read it.

  • Cindy Kirkland
    2019-05-12 14:54

    I find it hard to believe that all of these were history's GREATEST deceptions. I also did not care for the retelling of every other story in the beginning of the next story. Repetitive. But okay as a bathroom read.

  • Nicole
    2019-04-26 15:38

    This book was interesting and fun to read, but there were some problematic issues with the book. For starters, Chaline has issues when it comes to covering gender/sex. For starters, his definition of transsexual is wrong: being trans is not acting in a way that's not consistent with the conventional gender role ascribed to the biological sex (if that was the case, every tomboy out there would be considered trans). It's considering oneself the opposite sex from their biological one. He also employs the term 'shell shock', which hasn't been used in years. Now it's called PTSD.Then there were 'hoaxes' that make the book that shouldn't have. Hoaxes are deliberate things, so if there's no planned deception involved, it can't be included as a hoax. Another one having to with gender is the article on Stanislawa Walasiewicz: If she considered and thought of herself as a woman, then she wasn't deceiving anyone, intersex or not. The same goes with the cold fusion article: Chaline attributes the whole thing to sloppy research methodology and rushed results, not a deliberate deception on the part of the scientists. Thus, not a hoax. Lastly, the big foot example: it's not 100% proven that it was hoaxed, and no one has admitted it was a hoax. Just because he thinks it's a fake, doesn't mean he can include it in the book as a hoax when it's not proven to be.On that note, the tone of the book is really condescending. Chaline clearly doesn't believe in any of the paranormal entries, and that's fine, but his tone insults those who do. That was poor form on his part, since it takes away any effort at being impartial and unbiased.

  • Dr. Thomas Wasser
    2019-04-21 16:47

    Not very good. The author has a clear anti-religion agenda and pretty much just writes what he discovered from reading a few websites. Not well thought out, not well planned. It does have a well organized sequential system to it but the writing is poor and uninteresting. I think you can find many more bathroom readers that are better than this one. Skip it.

  • Robbie Sellars
    2019-05-16 17:46

    I liked the concept of the book, but found the articles too detailed. I found myself glazing over in several sections.

  • Kitten
    2019-05-05 12:42

    The cynic in me truly appreciates the premise of the book. It is a fun way to read about some interesting aspects of human history and folly, although it does only provide the basics of each story.