Read Kings of the Dead by Tony Faville Online

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Note from the Author: "Hello! This may seem like an odd request, but please stop buying this copy of Kings of the Dead. An expanded version of the book has been picked up for publication by Permuted Press and will be available shortly. I would hate for you to purchase this copy only to see an expanded version available shortly after. It takes 6-8 weeks for books to be remoNote from the Author: "Hello! This may seem like an odd request, but please stop buying this copy of Kings of the Dead. An expanded version of the book has been picked up for publication by Permuted Press and will be available shortly. I would hate for you to purchase this copy only to see an expanded version available shortly after. It takes 6-8 weeks for books to be removed from the Distribution Channel. So as long you see Createspace under the publisher listing, DO NOT BUY IT! Please, buy the version that is currently available from Permuted Press. Thank you." --Tony Faville...

Title : Kings of the Dead
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781449934897
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 200 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Kings of the Dead Reviews

  • Kat
    2019-03-24 01:49

    Kings of the Dead is written in journal form, which is a style I particularly like in zombie and post-apocalyptic books, as it tends to reveal more of the human emotion and daily struggles of the writer. There are also some entries from other characters, which add a new perspective to their situations.The majority of Kings of the dead is written by Cole, a survivalist who, along with his wife and friends, has prepared for the worst and escaped from the cities before it all goes pear-shaped.To begin with, I did find this book to be quite run-of-the-mill – the characters seemed a little cookie-cutter (ex Marine for example) and the action sequences a little too similar to so many other zombie books.However, Kings of the Dead did pick up, and posed some very important questions on what would happen to an ordinary person thrown into an undead world. Characters with medical conditions find their health improving and their ability to be self sufficient, and the idea of creating ‘channels’ around their safe-haven to ensure they only have to fight zombies a handful at a time, rather than being overrun by a horde is an interesting one that I have not come across before.There is quite a bit of discussion over weapons which I do admit I skimmed – not because it was badly written or inaccurate, it just held little interest for me.Kings of the Dead does delve into the darker side of the ‘human factor’ and there are several disturbing scenes, however these are necessary to the story and show the struggle that normal human beings have maintaining their moral and ethical standards in a world falling apart.It’s not easy to write a book that stands out in a sub-genre that’s experienced such fast growth and popularity but Kings of the Dead holds its own. And the ending is just that, an ending! Hurray!

  • Becky
    2019-04-20 01:42

    3.5 StarsI snagged this audiobook in a BOGO offer from Audible, and, as has been the case with most of the ones I acquire this way, I'm not sorry I did. This was a pretty decent zombie story, and it was a good bit of entertainment for a few hours while I knitted. This was told in journal format, and unlike a certain... OTHER zombie book written in that format, this one was actually good. Not only was the journal mentioned as being for posterity, but the tone and style was actually the way that a person would write a journal, instead of date-stamping a first person narrative and calling it a journal. There were no needless explanations of every detail ever, but rather ones that made sense. How was the camp outfitted, who was there, what happened? I want to know those things, not that the journal is written in purple ink. So I was happy that this one did it right. Also, the "action" happened off-screen, as you would expect. With that... OTHER book, I kept picturing the "journal"-writer asking the zombies for a time-out so that he could jot down his last couple moves (left foot, right foot, dodge, missed headshot, aim, headshot clip, left foot...) OK, caught up... time-in! This was realistic in a way that that... OTHER book was not. Instead of the play-by-play that sounds like someone describing frame by frame video action to a blind person, we get entries that lead up to an event... and then entries that discuss what happened at the event, usually with a nice foreshadow lead-in to the follow-up entry, like "Dammit, I wish Billy hadn't brought that stupid dog. It would have changed things, and maybe Billy would have come back with us..." (That's a made up example.) It definitely kept me interested and kept the pace up. I don't know that I really cared about any of the characters until quite a ways into the book, though. None of them felt really fleshed out and real to me until Cole and Derek (spelling?) were on their own. And then they started to really come into their characters and I began to like them. And I'll say that this book was a bit surprising because it actually made me a little emotional at times as well. Mostly toward the end, but there were pockets of good stuff in there throughout. And I liked that the last entry wasn't just sappy hero-worship, but actually brought a good dollop of realism to the table. Ahhh, bureaucracy! There was a little bit too much gun chatter for me, by which I mean that the model of every gun used was given, as well as the ammo, and other deadly weapons in their possession. I'm not all that interested in that stuff, so I kinda glazed over during the descriptions of the deadlies, but I understand why it was there. Who knows who will need to be able to arm themselves down the road and can learn something from the journal? Still... it was a bit much. I also liked the plausibility of the cause of the zombies as well. It seemed realistic enough to me, and honestly that was the scariest part of the book, because viruses DO mutate and change and one never really knows what they'll change into, or what the effect could be to a human body when it comes into contact... But I do wish that there was more consistency regarding the two different kinds of zombies. This was brought up and mentioned a few times, until the reveal, and then the "new" zombies really weren't seen again after that. Also, I wish that there was a bit more closure with the off-shoot group of refugees than the single liner "This is what happened to them" that we got. But, overall, a pretty decent story and the audio was pretty good as well. I'd recommend it... *shrug* Though maybe not when eating. ;)

  • Brainycat
    2019-03-22 01:35

    This book is written as a journal spanning about 3 detailed years followed by a long, drawn out denouement that covers another 6 years after a zombie apocalypse that nearly extincts humans. It's written from the point of view of a survivalist who had prepared for a civilization-ending event, though he's not a rightwing paramilitary type. In fact, the language (PAW, BOL, BZ, HF, etc) and the suppositions the author makes about the nature of the post-apocalypse world lead me to believe the author has more than a passing familiarity with Zombie Squad.It is a very, very quick read. There are no artfully crafted sentences that are worth underlining and coming back to. I found the characterization was just enough to keep the story moving, but at no point did I really feel engaged with any of the survivors mentioned. Early on, the narrator mentions that he's keeping the journal for posterity's sake, rather than a way to process his feelings. In retrospect, this feels like a gimmick to allow the author to avoid filling out the characters and let him focus on what the book really seems to be about: surviving in a zombie-infested world where humans are few and far between.On that level, it's a great introduction to the popular concepts of survivalism. Again, the author takes great pains to avoid any proselytizing about ideology and clearly avoids politics and religion. At no point did I fill like I was reading any sort of diatribe about the way the government works or who's god is more right than anyone else's, a very welcome change from most survivalist books I've seen.Fans of zombie thrillers may be a bit disappointed; being in journal format, all the action happens in past tense and is written as a terse recollection. Additionally, the narrator's band of survivors have incredibly good luck traveling about and locating heavy weapons. It felt very much like the author was going out of his way to setup a situation where his protagonists were ideally prepared for a cross country trip. Sure enough, he sends them on a cross country survey of how different groups of humans organize themselves on after civilization breaks down. This is where the book really started to come alive for me, as rather than rehash the basic principles of building secure fortresses, securing supplies and shooting zombies, this part of the book reads like an adventure story - "Two Guys and an M-2" - and finally we have some antagonists who are still alive.The book concludes with what I can only say is the author's personal wet dream. Without giving away too much of the ending (and you'll see it coming a mile away, anyways) the author does survive into posterity long after his body rots away.I would recommend this to fans of the post-apocalyptic or survival genres moreso than zombie fans, as zombies are just the convenient backdrop against which the author shares his notions about survival. It was an entertaining couple of hours, and I don't regret reading it, though I doubt I'll be reading it again.

  • Heather Faville
    2019-03-24 02:33

    This is not a true review as I am the wife of the author. I just wanted it to be known that Kings of the Dead is now released through Permuted Press and has been revised and 30% expanded for this new publication. Some of our beta readers have stated that it is the "same great universe...just more of it" and I truly agree.

  • Felicia A
    2019-04-21 04:46

    So....here's another one you zombie lovers will want to sink your teeth into. It's another one that I read, loved, and ended up editing a re-release of.It was good to start with, and even better now what with the editing (!) and the snazzy new cover art from a Permuted Press artist.Here is the original version: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/74...And my original review:Read from April 27 to 28, 2010 I read this in a few hours. It was very good, had some different twists, and was well written, hence my four star review. I thouroughly enjoyed this addition to my growing zombie collection. I am also pleased to report that, though this was a self-published offering, there are barely any editing complaints I have, which is unusual, and though there were mistakes here and there, it was refreshingly well proofread. I think the journal style has been done enough, that's my only real complaint about this particular book. Having the journal style with no dates, no page numbers and no general sense of the timing of events took away from the story for me. Because it is written in first person, we never hear anyone else's "voice", and there is somewhat of a disconnect at times. The story covers over a 10 year span of time, but you don't really get a sense of that because of how it's written. And again, because of the journal style, there is not a true sense of character development, only players in a drama. So, timing and flow-wise, it was a little odd, because you never have a sense of immediacy or involvement. I really liked that, though of course there are zombies and they are a threat, this group of survivors was not constantly on the run, always running from zombies, and had a chance to make a home several times. That was also refreshing. ************************************************************************ STOP READING NOW IF YOU DON'T WANT SPOILERS STOP READING NOW IF YOU DON'T WANT SPOILERS STOP READING NOW IF YOU DON'T WANT SPOILERS ************************************************************************ I don't personally mind a spoiler here and there, but I know some folks get irate over them. :-) Moving along.... I didn't really understand the whole Tony*/American Hero/Smithsonian thing. To me, he was just doing what needed to be done, which does not necessarily a hero make. The cannibals are a nice new element, as is the cause of the outbreak, the Swine Flu vaccine, which isn't really a spoiler because it's on PAGE 1. Mr. Faville did a well and believable job with his story arc, I just think it would have worked better NOT as a journal. Will definitely be following this new author in this genre. A few "UGH" moments. These were the most well stocked survivors ever in the history of a zombie novel. Ever. Er....what the hell happened to Goat? Um, CUBA gave us refuge????? Um, the PHONES still work? *Man character is now named Cole instead of Tony.

  • Felicia A
    2019-04-07 03:32

    I read this in a few hours. It was very good, had some different twists, and was well written, hence my four star review. I thouroughly enjoyed this addition to my growing zombie collection. I am also pleased to report that, though this was a self-published offering, there are barely any editing complaints I have, which is unusual, and though there were mistakes here and there, it was refreshingly well proofread.I think the journal style has been done enough, that's my only real complaint about this particular book. Having the journal style with no dates, no page numbers and no general sense of the timing of events took away from the story for me. Because it is written in first person, we never hear anyone else's "voice", and there is somewhat of a disconnect at times.The story covers over a 10 year span of time, but you don't really get a sense of that because of how it's written. And again, because of the journal style, there is not a true sense of character development, only players in a drama. So, timing and flow-wise, it was a little odd, because you never have a sense of immediacy or involvement.I really liked that, though of course there are zombies and they are a threat, this group of survivors was not constantly on the run, always running from zombies, and had a chance to make a home several times. That was also refreshing.************************************************************************STOP READING NOW IF YOU DON'T WANT SPOILERS STOP READING NOW IF YOU DON'T WANT SPOILERS STOP READING NOW IF YOU DON'T WANT SPOILERS************************************************************************I don't personally mind a spoiler here and there, but I know some folks get irate over them. :-) Moving along....I didn't really understand the whole Tony/American Hero/Smithsonian thing. To me, he was just doing what needed to be done, which does not necessarily a hero make.The cannibals are a nice new element, as is the cause of the outbreak, the Swine Flu vaccine, which isn't really a spoiler because it's on PAGE 1. Mr. Faville did a well and believable job with his story arc, I just think it would have worked better NOT as a journal. Will definitely be following this new author in this genre.A few "UGH" moments.These were the most well stocked survivors ever in the history of a zombie novel. Ever. Er....what the hell happened to Goat?Um, CUBA gave us refuge?????Um, the PHONES still work?

  • Nicole Smith
    2019-03-28 05:50

    Before I delve into my review of Tony Faville‘s Kings of the Dead, I must admit I haven’t read many zombie stories, so my knowledge of them is fairly limited, but I am an avid reader, so I still know what makes a great read, at least to me.I like a story that draws me in and holds my attention to the very end. I like characters that I can relate to and who resonate with me. I also love stories that make me feel something — that touch my heart. And if they make me ask questions…even better.Kings of the Dead accomplished all of that and more.I started reading the book Saturday night around 7pm, and I read through until 11:30 or so before turning in for the night. By that time I was already 53% done with the book. I finished reading it yesterday afternoon.Once I started reading it, I couldn’t stop. The story sucked me in from the very first page, and it didn’t let me go until the end.What I Loved About Kings of the Dead:I loved the journal format.I loved all the details on weaponry used to deal with the zombies and other problems the Kings faced.I loved the way all the characters interacted with each other.I also loved reading about all the stockpiling of food and equipment.For those who don’t know, I’m a huge advocate of stockpiling and preparing for the worst. I also am a huge advocate of learning how to be self-sufficient and live off the land, so Kings of the Dead definitely has a leg up on the competition, at least in my book. (I’d like to think that if faced with the same scenario, I would be a part of a group like the Kings.)Now, I must ask, who actually cries when reading a zombie novel? Well, this chick, that’s who. Go ahead and laugh if you want, but it’s true. There were parts of the book that made me cry. I don’t want to give away too much, so I’ll leave it at that.I highly recommend Kings of the Dead to all zombie fans. It’s a quick, fast-paced, entertaining story that will leave you wishing there was more to read.Total stars: FIVE!I, for one, cannot wait to read Tony’s second book Slow Burn. If Kings of the Dead is any indication of what this author is capable of, I think it’s going to be fantastic.

  • Shirley
    2019-04-05 05:33

    I really enjoyed this book and it was a fairly quick read. The book was written in a journal style from the point of view of Cole (mainly with a few others thrown in occasionally). It's a post apocalyptic zombie novel. I admit that it is hard to bring tears to my eyes when reading a novel (it's much easier when I watch a movie) but I found my eyes sweating three times in this novel. As you can imagine then, this novel deals with more than simply killing zombies and surviving, it also deals with human interactions and the psychological dysfunctions that a post apocalyptic world is likely to exacerbate. I really think the psychological aspects were well displayed here. For me the 1st 10% of the novel was a little slow and seemed to drag but after that I had a hard time putting the novel down. Also I need to advise you that there is excruciating detail on the numerous (and I do mean numerous) weapons that the survival group obtained on their journey. For me the gun is either a pistol, rifle, assault rifle or grenade launcher. Anything else is totally lost on me. I sure all of you weapons guys will enjoy that though. Overall I was very impressed with the novel and would recommend it to the post apocalyptic reader.

  • Fabian
    2019-03-30 06:37

    I'll start off by saying that I appreciate Mr. Faville's references to zombie film & literature scattered throughout his novel. This book first appealed to me because it is written in a similar style to J.L. Bourne's Day by Day Armageddon. In my opinion Kings of the Dead is superior because the story's protagonists aren't clueless victims in a zombie apocalypse, they are zombie aficionados prior to the outbreak. This book IS unnerving. It's not even the zombies which make this book unsettling, it's the interactions between human beings and what they're capable of performing once social boundaries and morals are gone which makes this book suspenseful, in that sense this story is very Romero-esque.I finished this book in a three hour sitting, it's that fucking good. By the time I had finished the book my nails were bloody & sore from constant gnawing due to my uncertainty of what lay ahead.

  • Kay
    2019-03-31 05:32

    I loved this book, it's well written with a storyline that veers away from the standard zombie books, it hooks you in straight away and really is a book where you are thinking "just one more page" and before you know it you have finished it. I love the descriptive language and style of this book, it is a very enjoyable read for zombie fans and anyone - even if you are not into zombie fiction I would recommend this book. Yes it has some standard zombie aspects but the book is not so much about zombies and the end of the world but how people (in this case a small group) deal with it and learn how to cope with things they expected and didn't expect. Well worth reading and I cannot wait to read more from this author!

  • David Biondi
    2019-04-08 02:56

    I don't normally like to curse in my reviews but HOLY SHIT! This book was so intense I can't begin to explain. This isn't your normal zombie story. It focuses a lot more on the people and their living in the post apocalyptic world. The book reads like a journal which I found to make for an extremely easy read because most chapters or rather journal entries are nice and short. With this in mind you can't help but get so incredibly attached to the characters you react as their situations change. The story was so good and I can't say much more than that because I don't want to spoil the ending but it was amazing. READ THIS BOOK RIGHT NOW!

  • Robert
    2019-04-01 06:56

    Great book! Bought it for the Kindle and read it in a day!

  • Aaron
    2019-04-15 08:00

    Kings of the Dead By Tony FavilleThis is a zombie book. This is not just a book about going around killing zombies, seeing people get eaten and turned, and scrambling for shelter with no plans or character building. No this is the journal of Tony the Zombie Hunter, his life and his family and friends. However, there is a crap load of the killing and eating in this book.This is Tony Faville’s first book. It was written in 22 days last year. I will be honest, I had never heard of this book before I was the fortunate winner of a book drawing on Goodreads.com. Soon after winning, Tony sent me an email and gave me the lowdown about what the book was about.With his permission here is what he emailed me: Kings was written in a brief 22 days for the National Novel Writing Month that took place this last year. It was also written in a true journal format, so hopefully you don’t mind that format. One thing of note, it was written by a true fan of the zombie genre and that is something that shows in the book. It also is more about the people than the zombies. At first I was freaking ecstatic about winning this book and the fact the Author actually emailed me. Then I was a little leery about the book and hoped that I would be able to get into it because it is a self published book and was written in 22 days. This feeling was short lived and quickly discarded.HELL Yes I was able to get into it!The book is wrote in a journal format first and foremost. So each “chapter” is an entry and reads like your diary would, well maybe written a little better than yours. This is the first major plus this book gave. It immediately puts you into Tony’s shoes. You get the feeling you are reading a real persons secret thoughts and feelings. Almost at once you build a connection to the characters in this book for the reasons I mentioned.This book struck a chord with me because it used the practicality of a real rational person during an outbreak and when I thought of books or movies where the were fighting zombies or what have you and/or they were all alone he did things that I would have done.The second plus this book had was its the great aspect of planing. You don’t just go around for food, shelter and weapons. You make a systematic approach to these things. As awesome as Zombie Land was, they were not smart about things at all. While reading this book I caught myself saying “Now thats a good idea” or “That is exactly what I would do”.The book is one of the coolest zombie/Post Apocalyptic books I have ever read. It follows Tony and how he survives in the world after a zombie outbreak. The H1N1 vaccine was the cause of zombie outbreak and within a short matter of time the US and most other countries around the world have been over run with zombies. That leaves the characters of this story alone to defend for themselves. They do not have protection from the government to help them with the hordes of zombies or cannibals but they have each other.Living in Oregon; Tony, his wife and his friends all find themselves virtually alone in this world surviving day in and day out with the constant threat of zombies, shelter, food and other provisions. Tony uses his military knowledge and they quickly creates a great shelter and search for provisions on a daily basis always trying to go in groups of 2 or more to protect on another.One of the greatest aspects about this book is Tony and his friends were all huge fans of zombies. So they were prepared for this. It goes into great detail about what they did before there was ever an outbreak to prepare for the what if’s of life. Like what if there was a major catastrophe, or a flood or earthquake. They were just prepared. With our world going to hell in a hand basket this is something that everyone should be thinking about and is not just for the extreme types of people. Everyone should have at least a 72 hour kit for their family. My family has one.Going back to the story…Tony (the author and character) was in the military so weapon names, combat strategies, mentality and abbreviations all come in to play. If you like guns at all they use a lot of different types with various results.Tony and company travel around Astoria Oregon (I wish he would have made a Goonies reference) throughout a big chunk of the book and later across the US fighting zombies and making friends along the way. I am going to keep any of the plot details to a minimum so that you can discover for yourself when, not if, you read it.The book covers love, loss, item hunting, zombie killing, travel, conspiracy, treachery, and the true power of friendship.A little warning about this book is it does have a fair share of language. Nothing too profane but the “f-bomb” is used but who wouldn’t use it in a time like that. This book also have a lot of violence. If it didn’t it wouldn’t be a zombie novel. So that part should be a given.The best way to describe this book would be to compare it to several things. It would be a mix of Left 4 Dead (he makes reference to this in the book), I am Legend (the book not the movie), Zombieland (for the humor and sheer awesomeness), Survival Man (Discovery Channel show, for the documentation of his crazy life), and Fallout 3 (for the grandiose scale and weapon hunting). But with all the references this book manages to capture something very real and original.Go buy and read this book (if you are into zombies that is) and find out for yourself how awesome this book really is. I am a lucky person to have been able to have found this diamond in the rough and I will do my best to spread the word around for the future success of this book.

  • Dan C.
    2019-04-19 04:32

    The UU Church we attend has a small group that meets Wednesday nights that, if memory serves, used to be called "The Gospel Group." Looking to revamp itself for the New Year, they rechristened themselves the "Heretics & Spirituality Group." One of the co-leaders is my friend on Facebook and she encouraged me to attend based on my zombie interest as they were going to be discussing zombies and spirituality. Only if you threw in a trashy 90s Eurodance beat could you have something better suited for me. We have two books we're working from right now and one of them is the book I just finished today, Tony Faville's Kings of the Dead.Kings of the Dead is the story of the zombie apocalypse. Yes, I know. You're thinking "Dan, how many stories of the zombie apocalypse can you possibly read?" My answer to that question is "how high can you count?" The thing is, despite the fact that all the zombie novels and movies tell more or less the same story, it's how they tell it and the specifics that matter. The source of the zombie apocalypse this time around was the H1N1 vaccine. I'll admit that when I stood in line for mine in the fall of 2009, I couldn't help but think "This is how the end of the world in the movie I Am Legend came about! The cancer vaccine turned everyone into zombies!" The use of H1N1 was both effective and timely and clearly Faville is not the only one with that idea as a book called Mad Swine is on my to-be-read list for the year. Most of the normal zombie rules apply. These are reanimated dead people that shamble around slowly. A bite will infect you and they can only be killed with a shot to the head. As everyone knows, that's the cardinal zombie rule - kill the brain, you kill the ghoul.The story is told in the form of 91 journal entries by a guy named Tony. It was an interesting way to tell the story but was ultimately rather limiting. Apart from a few journal entries made by others in the group, Tony's is the only head we're allowed inside of. And he's not a terribly sympathetic character - at least not initially. Also, the journal entry way of telling the story made it hard to fit in what I lovingly refer to as "hot zombie action." The zombie encounters were necessarily told in the past tense and lacked the immediacy of a third person omniscient that most of the zombie novels I've read up to this point have adopted. I also found that it made it hard to really flesh out the characters. These are people we were supposed to care about but it was hard for me to care about them when I didn't really feel like I knew them that well.There was also a tremendous amount of time spent on the weaponry used to fight the zombies. Whenever we got to the parts that involved detailed descriptions of weapons that were being plundered, be it from an abandoned military base, a sporting goods store or wherever, I found myself going "blah blah blah blah guns blah grenades blah blah bazooka." That's certainly not the fault of the author. Tony was a gun guy, so it was only natural that he would be interested in and have a great deal of knowledge regarding firearms and other weapons. I just didn't find it that interesting and certainly not essential to my enjoyment of the story. But do remember that this is coming from a guy that has never even held a gun and has a hard time keeping track of who frequently feels like the most clueless person watching a James Bond film.Kings of the Dead was written as a NaNoWriMo book (hey, I know another book that was written as a NaNoWriMo book that ultimately got published!) and was self-published by Faville, although it has recently been picked up by Permuted Press which is a house that specializes in allowing you to read about the end of the world to your heart's content. Apparently, Faville has taken a lot of heat for being self-published but you know what? This is a changing world and it looks to me like publishing is changing as fast as the music business has and clearly, the old rules of distribution really no longer apply. I applaud him for writing a book and getting it out there, which is more than most of us will do in our lifetime.Kings of the Dead had a great beginning and end, but the middle was a bit of a struggle for me. I had a hard time staying engaged with the book and I'm not sure I would have finished it had it not been for the Heretics & Spirituality. But to be fair, I might not have even heard of it had it not been for them either. So I guess it's a three-star book for me. A fairly decent entry into the large amounts of zombie fiction that is out there now but not one that I will be rereading. That said, I'd be open to reading another of his books. Recommended for zombie fans only.

  • Jamie Martinez
    2019-04-15 01:56

    I purchased this audiobook for a planned road trip, that eventually fell through. I'm so disappointed. It reads like a 8th grader wrote it. The repetitiveness is overwhelming. Example1... "H" called from the fort on his walkie talkie this morning. He was coming back from the fort, he was coming back fast, he has someone with him. He was pissed. Example2... I watched one that collapsed like a demolition building. As it lay there unable to move, I could tell that it was still "living" even though it could no longer move. This zombie could have been advanced in years before he became a zombie. I honestly couldn't say, he was that badly decomposed. So to give a definitive answer on whether they will all come to a sudden end in time or if this one was just assisted in his decay by advanced age before he turned, I cannot give that answer.I like a book that can elicit an emotion from me.. to laugh, cry but not holler out loud in my car.. OH MY.. NO REALLY! SO HE'S COMING BACK FROM THE FORT RIGHT?? I mean, I get it.. the zombie couldn't move and you don't know if they are all going to just decay to ineffectiveness given enough time. I reminds me of grade school homework where you always start your answer by rephrasing the question. The reason the sky is blue is because......I'm not a writer and I wouldn't begin to pretend to be a good reviewer but I can say this is one of the worst books I've ever read/listened to and I have read a lot books from the silly teeny boppers to the classics. I'm grateful to Audible's return policy. I will be using that shortly.Oh finally it's over..

  • Badseedgirl
    2019-04-04 04:32

    Sometimes lightning does strike twice. The last two zombie novels I have read have been surprisingly well written and have been a credit to the genre. Kings of The Dead by Tony Faville most definitely falls into this category.Written in Journal form similar to excellent "Zombie Fallout" series by Mark Tufo, and less successful but still great read "Day By Day Armageddon" by J.L. Bourne. This is the story of Cole Helman and his group of Zombie enthusiast survivors, who jokingly named themselves "Kings Of The Dead". What makes this novel so good, is the reader is able to follow Cole's decent into depression and madness watching his friends and family slowly be taken from him. Mr. Faville does an admirable job making light of the waves and waves of zombie novels and movies out there today. The has his character Cole write about using these movies and novels to help him survive. I just loved this novel and look forward to reading more from this author.

  • Jon Spoelstra
    2019-04-15 01:46

    I had never read a zombies book before. Heck, the few times I started to watch zombie movies I got bored and stopped watching. Then I sat down to try Kings of the Dead. Before I started I was ready to dump it, but I thought I'd at least read the first couple chapters or so. Hours later I finished it. In one sitting. So, here's the deal. Right from the get-go, Kings of the Dead grabs you. If it didn't, I wouldn't have stayed through it, nor written this review. Others describe the story line, I'm here just to describe the experience. It's part literature and part video game (it's not really a video game, but that's how I imagined when the characters were blasting zombies all over the place with all types of cool weapons) and all-day fun. If I can get that much fun out of a book, then that book has done everything I need it to do.

  • you know that you want my books ;)
    2019-04-06 04:00

    the best zombie book that i have ever read!!!!Are you someone that is always a step behind the times? Do you still do "The Wave" at sporting events? Do you still listen to audio cassettes? Did you just start texting? Here is your chance to be in on the NEW THING. The Book is KINGS OF THE DEAD by Tony Faville. His book is going to be HUGE! Why? Because it is the most authentic zombie book of all time. The book is written as a journal of the zombie apoc. (called the P.A.W. -post apocolyptic world in the book). The book stretches over the span of several years, and as time slips away the tone of the journal grows darker. I don't want to go into great detail because I don't want to spoil the story. BUY THE BOOK. It will be the best ten bucks that you ever spent and for once you will be at the tip of the spear of the next big thing.

  • Jason Taylor
    2019-04-18 08:56

    I didn't expect much from this book. I ordered it after reading an article in USA Today about "good" apocalyptic novels that are a new fad in this country. I do like this genre, and I read it from time to time. In short, this was one of the most enjoyable reads that I've had. It's probably the best journal since Anne Frank. It's not too complicated and it's very human. The novel, like most apocalyptic works reduce civilization to it's most basic where laws and social norms are removed and the Ten Commandments are all that's left. There's a certain cry for freedom being expressed by authors and readers of the genre, and the protagonist of this novel embodies that.It took me two days to read 250 pages and I was satisfied the entire time. Highly recommended.

  • Rachelle
    2019-04-05 08:42

    I have read the first edition of this book and quite enjoyed it even though zombies are really my thing. Can't wait to read a nice chunk of this.----I have now finished and have completely enjoyed the new version of this adventure. Just the right amount of details, nicely placed adaptations to the origional story. Really was a very enjoyable read.----review will be available in May at DoubleshotReviews.com

  • Jim Johnston
    2019-04-04 03:40

    If you are hoping for a new twist on the zombie apocalypse genre, look elsewhere. Mr. Faville's book reads as though it were written by a 15 year old with a penchant for cliched action films. That being said, I read every page. It's a quick read, and certainly could have been a worse first effort.

  • Wt
    2019-03-28 02:00

    While the audiobook narrator was not good (especially with voices), this was a great story and gave a simple message in the end: your word is the most important thing you can give to anyone!

  • Tony
    2019-04-17 06:50

    Haven't been steered wrong yet by a Permuted Press book. Good stuff.

  • Lollie
    2019-04-13 02:48

    Finally! A zombie book that lives up to the hype. I think it's the fact that it's written in the perspective of a journal, rather than an all out story.

  • Jennifer Arney
    2019-04-16 08:47

    good, really cool story!

  • Patrick D'Orazio
    2019-04-15 05:59

    Kings of the Dead came out six years ago, and as was quite popular at that time with zombie genre books, was written in a journal format. The popularity of that format has died down in recent years but with my attempts to read many of the books I failed to read in years past, I am reminded once again how many authors chose to go this route. I’ve shared the advantages and disadvantages of this format in prior reviews, and of course, this book is no exception. I do give credit where credit is due, of course. Author Tony Faville remains true to the format, not moving to a third person narrative at any point, which some authors tend to do when they feel the relentless need to reveal things the narrator doesn’t know and thus can’t share with the reader. To avoid this pitfall, Cole’s journal is written in by others when he is not available at certain points in time, which fills in those gaps in the story there would otherwise be if limited to his perspective alone. This adds a few interesting twists to the story as Cole himself reads these entries, left as notes for him upon his return to his journal. It serves as smoother tale because the author didn’t suddenly change writing styles, which I appreciated. The story is fairly standard zompoc fare, told from the perspective of a man with former military and medical experience, who has prepared with a group of friends for the end of the world as we know it for several years as a hobby. Zombies crop up when the vaccine for a new strain of the flu ends up reanimating those who have taken it. The zombies are mainly the slow shamblers here, with a mix of faster undead joining the fray as the story and timeline moves forward. This is a fairly personal story. Like some of the other journal written sagas, there is a good chunk of the author’s personality shining through the narrator. This is a story of someone who is a fan of the genre writing a story of survival they have envisioned for themselves and their friends. It does add something to the telling of the tell-a pseudo autobiography envisioned by the author were there a zombie apocalypse. Authors are guided to “write what you know” and Tony does so here, having the personal knowledge related to weaponry, medical skills, and other related topics that would have an impact on survival in an undead world. Credit to the author for not ‘over doing it’ as I have seen a tendency of some to do when it comes to slathering their pages with an excess of demonstrated expertise in a particular area that rapidly turns into overkill. The flow here is more natural and the while the reader will know the author knows his stuff, they won’t be blasted with it on every page. While the survivors hunker down, attempting to build a new home in their region of Oregon for much of the first half of the book, the story becomes, in time, more of a road trip as Cole, the narrator, ponders the meaning of existence in a dead world and chooses to take a journey of discovery. Cole struggles with the loss of friends and trying to find a reason to carry on, but there are also glimmers of hope that give him, and the reader, reasons to carry on. There are some rough spots in the story and some of that comes from the format-we don’t get to discovery something happening as it happens, but written as a report done the following day or in the hours following the actual event, which dilutes some of the emotional resonance. Still, there is definite emotional potency here, especially as related to the people Cole deeply cares for and will do anything to try and keep safe, which in the an undead world is a very difficult thing to do. As is the case with many journal oriented zombie tales, there is not necessarily a main focus outside of survival written on its pages-survival of the body as well as the spirit. As such, it meanders a good bit, but the ending was quite satisfying and unlike many of the books of a similar make and model, the author doesn’t demand that you read three or four more entries in a series to make his point. This book does so succinctly and with quiet grace.Overall, if as a zombie genre fan you aren’t burnt out on the diary approach to zombie fiction, Kings of the Dead is a solid addition to your library.

  • Justin
    2019-04-21 01:34

    When the world ended, it went out exactly like Cole Helman and his friends said it would. Not by nuclear war or natural disaster, but by the walking dead. Of course, Cole and his crew - the newly christened Kings of the Dead - never truly believed that zombies would overtake civilization, but when it happened the preparations they made were just enough to keep them alive. Now they just had to learn to survive in a radically different world that was rife with danger from both the living and the undead.Zombie 411 - The zombies in Kings of the Dead seem to be based largely on the Romero style, though at points throughout the story we're introduced to slight variations (i.e. faster, stronger). Nothing too radical, but enough to keep things interesting, though I was a bit surprised that the zombies didn't play a much larger role in this story beyond the initial outbreak and immediate aftermath.Written in the now-familiar journal format, Tony Faville isn't breaking any new ground with Kings of the Dead, but he does serve up a totally enjoyable tale that's easy to get caught up in. I like that the main character is more of an everyday slob (with a zombie fixation) than some ultra-prepared, ultra-paranoid urban commando. It may be fun to read about these guys in books like Day by Day Armageddon or Year of the Dead (Sustainable Earth), but it's a lot easier to relate to a guy like Cole, who makes mistakes and is simply doing the best he can to stay alive. The story has a nice pace, lets you get to know the characters pretty well (the main ones at least), and for the most part is believable (though there are moments that make you scratch your head). Overall, Kings of the Dead probably isn't at the same level as Day By Day Armageddon or The Infection, but it is a very fun post-apocalyptic tale that should please most fans of the genre.Edition Notes - Kings of the Dead was recently reissued in a Revised and Expanded edition. I missed this book the first time around, so I don't know how much has been added. I can say, however, that the spelling and grammar issues other reviewers have cited appear to have been corrected. There weren't any that caught my eye at least.

  • Melissa Dally
    2019-04-09 06:44

    A good journal-style read (sort of in the style of Day by Day Armageddon). Yes you will need to get over that the author named the main character & wife after himself and his IRL wife. It seems like a hugely silly thing to do, but he does it so what can ya do. Also I caught punctuation and grammar errors, but since this was supposed to be a dude's journal, maybe they were deliberate. The premise is what if zombies turned up in a world where people knew what zombies were. I have wondered this myself. Everybody always seems so shocked and I'm like "OK, NOBODY saw Dawn of the Dead?" LOL. You also will get more out of this if you have seen a goodish amount of zombie movies (which I have) and/or are a gun nut (which I am not. All the weapons specs meant little to me). But I'm used to that in zombie apocalypse books and it doesn't interfere with my enjoyment of the story at all.It's interesting, definitely an engaging read with a plausible explanation for the various observed zombie types. The ending is a weee bit contrived and could have been better, but no book is perfect and if you enjoy zombies you will enjoy this book

  • Riitta
    2019-03-27 06:33

    Yeah......+ for the conclusion, I hate when things are left hanging% can't decide if either a plus or a minus: the book had a feel that it was written 'realistically' as in "what would I do in a zombie apocalypse". When thought of that way I thought with the scavenging etc I would imagine that is what would happen with survivors, but when thought in a way "this is a book not reality" it gets quite boring to read about finding different supplies page after page. I wanted more action and more depth to all the character. As nice of a thought it is to make the book a journal I dont't think it worked that well.- the way the main character tells the story feels a bit arrogant and superhuman- from the beginning made me think of Nat Geos 'Doomsday Preppers' way too much (not the writers fault...)- too much guntalk of which I basically just understood AK-47- the end was pushing it too much on the mushy side- some phrases really annoyed me

  • Lucas Darathy
    2019-04-21 08:53

    This was okay. I liked some parts, and I liked them a lot. Other parts, though... not so much.There was no real conflict. They'd go somewhere. There'd be some zombies, but it wasn't a chaotic situation. They'd handle it. And then find lots of food and weapons. Yay.That's kinda it.Once Kimmi started writing, it was much better (and about the last fifteen pages). She had a much more interesting voice and she made everything sound more real.Cole as the big hero was a big stretch to me, though. He was very meh.And half the book is gun propaganda. Which boring and shut up. If you really believe that the only way to solve criminality is to give guns to everybody, then you're not nearly as smart as you'd like to think you are.